ALISE Conference 2010 WIP Submission Sessions 2

 

Waseem Afzal 

Emporia State University 

(15)Classification Category and Code: LIS Education and Programs 

Intellectual and Professional Development of MLS Students: Evidence from the Analysis of the Students’ Capstone Portfolios at School of Library & Information Management, Emporia State University 

 

John Brobst 

Florida State University 

10. Information Policy 

Parity Lost: Federal Web Accessibility Policies Fail the Test 

 

Janet L. Capps 

Florida State University 

15. LIS Education and Programs 

More Questions than Answers: Taking Stock of Early Literacy 

 

Anthony S. Chow, Chase Baity, Christian Burris, David Rachlin and Margaret Smith 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

85. Administration and Management 

To Fine or Not to Fine: Is Positive Reinforcement More Effective Than Overdue Fines? 

 

Anthony S. Chow, Jason Alston, MLIS and Andrea Bottoms 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

16. LIS Faculty, Students 

Diversity and Retention in Librarianship: The Role of Advising and Mentoring 

 

Anthony S. Chow, Jason Alston, MLIS and Andrea Bottoms 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

16: LIS Faculty, Students 

The Role of Advising and Mentoring in Diversity and Retention in Librarianship 

 

Anthony S. Chow, Marilyn Zamarripa, Pamela Chappell, Chase Baity, David Rachlin and C. Vinson 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

74. Digital/ Virtual Libraries 

When Real and Virtual Worlds Collide: A Second Life Library 

 

Monica Colon- Aguirre and Karen Freberg, M.A. 

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville 

76. Academic Libraries 

A multidisciplinary case study analyzing Google’s key messages concerning the digitalization of books towards academiclibraries 

 

Andr de Souza Pena, Patrcia Marques de Arajo annd Alexandre de Oliveira de Meira Gusmo 

Federal University of Mato Grosso 

The study of organizational commitment and the development of librarians in Mato Grosso 

 

Kyong Eun Oh 

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey 

60. Knowledge/IR Management 

Collaborating through Topic Map for Knowledge Management (TMKM) 

 

Kasey Garrison, Dr. Gail Dickinson and Dr. Carol Doll 

Old Dominion University 

15. LIS Education and Programs 

The Role of Inter-Organizational Collaboration Theory in the Development of a Library Information Science Education

Program 

 

Carolyn Hank and Helen R. Tibbo 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

17: Pedagogy in LIS 

Applying Digital Curation Principles in Practical Settings: A Framework for Implementing Field Experiences from the DigCCurr Project 

 

John B. Harer, PhD 

East Carolina University 

86: Personnel and 90: Evaluation of Service 

Employees as Customers Judging Quality: Enhancing Employee Assessment 

 

Tina Inzerilla 

Queensland University of Technology/San Jose State University 

76. Academic Libraries 

Academic and library faculty collaboration: A social network analysis 

 

Melissa P. Johnston 

Florida State University 

77. School Media Centers/Libraries 

Enablers and Barriers to Technology Leadership for the School Library Media Specialist 

 

Mary Wilkins Jordan 

Simmons College 

#86 Personnel 

Can’t Get No Satisfaction? Come Work at the Library! 

 

Allison G. Kaplan 

University of Wisconsin – Madison 

15. LIS Education and Programs 

Community Engagement In LIS Education 

 

Ji-Hyun Kim 

Florida State University 

19. Distance Education in LIS 

Gap between Information Demand and Availability of Asians in U.S. 

 

Inna Kouper and Howard Rosenbaum 

Indiana University 

3. LIS as a Discipline 

From sociology to information studies: Patterns of theory importation

 

Hyungkyu Kwon, Ph.D. 

Kyungsung University, South Korea 

Problem-based EEG Neurofeedback Training Model for Successful Online Education

 

Chris Landbeck 

Florida State University 

5. Philosophy, Values, and Ethics of LIS 

The Nature of Information: A Novel Approach 

 

Dorian Mari-Elizabeth Lange 

University of Missouri: Columbia 

5. Philosophy, Values, and Ethics of LIS 

Librarians and Journalists: Their Shared Ethical Purpose 

 

Jung A Lee, Kathleen Burnett, Ph.D and Mia Liza A. Lustria, Ph.D. 

Florida State University 

Curriculum development for consumer health informatics in Library and Information Studies Programs 

 

Lauren H. Mandel and Katherine H. Weimer 

Florida State University and University Libraries, Texas A&M University 

15. LIS Education and Programs 

Necessary Skills for Map and GIS Librarians: Job Descriptions to Inform LIS Curriculum 

 

Joanne Gard Marshall, PhD, Jennifer Craft Morgan, PhD, Victor W. Marshall, PhD, Deborah Barreau, PhD, Barbara Moran,

PhD, Paul Solomon, PhD, Susan Rathbun Grubb, MAT, MLS and Cheryl A. Thompson 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and UNC Institute on Aging  

15. LIS Education and Programs 

Workforce Issues in Library and Information Science 2 (WILIS 2): Preliminary Results from the Recent Graduates Survey 

 

Eileen McElrath 

Texas Woman’s University 

Information Literacy and Instruction 

Utilizing Adult Learning Theory in Information Literacy Instruction and Library and Information Science Courses in the Digital Age.  

 

Patricia Montiel Overall 

University of Arizona 

43. Services for Multicultural Populations 

Assessing Information Literacy of 3rd and 4th Grade Latino Students: A Preliminary Report. 

 

Hea Lim Rhee 

University of Pittsburgh 

82. Archives and Records Centers 

The Relationship between Archival Appraisal Practice and the User Study in U.S. State Archives and Records Management Programs 

 

Angela R. Sample 

University of Missouri 

16. LIS Faculty, Students 

Lifelong Learning: Investigating Transference of Information Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills  

 

Kathleen Schisa, MSLIS 

Syracuse University, WISE Consortium 

19. Distance Education in LIS 

An Education in collaboration: Lessons learned from course development partnerships among WISE schools and associations 

 

Susan E. Searing 

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 

Area 76, Academic Libraries 

Transforming the “Librarian’s Library”: A Case Study of Change. 

 

Brooke Shannon 

University of Missouri 

49. Information Literacy and Instruction 

Using photography to enhance information literacy 

 

Cherri Shelnutt 

Texas Woman’s University 

19. Distance Education in LIS 

An Exploration of the Experiences of Pioneering Online Library and Information Science Graduate Students: A Mixed Methods Study of Students in the 1990s 

 

Scott Alan Smith and Dr. Loriene Roy 

Emporia State University and The University of Texas at Austin  

22: Acquisitions Theory and Practice 

15: LIS Education and Programs 

Gaining Competency in Acquisitions and Collection Development: A Schema for Preparing Entry Level Information Professionals for 21st Century Library Needs 

 

Cameron Tuai 

Indiana University – Bloomington 

85. Administration and Management 

Using Contingency Theory to Frame Collaboration within an Information Service Unit 

 

Diane L. Velasquez 

Dominican University 

90. Evaluation of Service 

National Survey of Practices: E-Government and Public Access Computers in Public Libraries 

 

Kate Vo Thi-Beard 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 

7. Libraries and Society/Culture 

Asian-American Magazines and Their Role in the Production and Dissemination of Information: Building Community and Cultural

Identity Among Readers of Audrey and Asian Wisconzine 

 

Holly Weimar, Ed. D. and Tricia Kuon, Ph. D. 

Sam Houston State University 

19 Distance Education in LIS 

Granted: Scholarships, School Librarians, and Culture


Understanding Users’ Needs for a Health Literacy Website:
The Information Horizons Approach

1 Xin Wang, Ph.D Candidate, xwbt8@mail.missouri.edu,
1 Erdelez, Sanda, Associate Professor, ErdelezS@mail.missouri.edu
1 Al Ghenaimi, Said Amer, Ph.D Student, saa7c4@mail.missouri.edu
2 Centner, Susan, BSN, scentner@rollanet.org
1 Chen, Weichao, Ph.D Student, wcxcf@mail.missouri.edu
1 Wang, Jiazhen, Ph.D Candidate, jw5wf@mail.missouri.edu
3 Ward, Deborah, MLS, WardDH@health.missouri.edu
1 Yadamsuren, Borchuluun, Ph.D Candidate, by888@mail.missouri.edu
1 School of Information Science & Learning Technologies, Information Experience Laboratory, University of Missouri, Tel: +1 573-884-2737
2 MAHEC Digital Library; Health Literacy Missouri
3 Health Science Libraries, University of Missouri, Health Literacy Missouri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Waseem Afzal
wafzal@emporia.edu
Phd Student
Emporia State University


(15)Classification Category and Code: LIS Education and Programs

 

Intellectual and Professional Development of MLS Students: Evidence from the Analysis of the Students’ Capstone Portfolios at School of Library & Information Management, Emporia State University

 

Emporia State University’s School of Library & Information Management (SLIM) has a long-standing tradition of requiring students to showcase their academic work (including class projects, Web sites, term papers-completed during MLS), and to tie it with SLIM’s program outcomes and professional values during the Capstone course. This course is a class that is required to be taken in the last semester of LIS graduate studies. This exercise provides an opportunity for students to reflect on their learning experience in totality and to explore its relevance with the professional practices. Besides this, the analysis of students’ capstone portfolios enables the administration and faculty to assess (1) the extent to which the school’s mission and core values had impact on the learning of students, (2) the nature of perceptions that students have towards the efficacy of SLIM’S MLS  curricula in enhancing academic and professional development, and (3) the extent to which changes are needed to  bring the graduate program in greater alignment with the changing academic and professional environment.


Research was done over three semesters during which SLIM’s capstone portfolios were analyzed, capstone portfolio presentations attended, and online student discussions were examined.  Basing on the initial analysis, the current study proposes that LIS schools should consider requiring a capstone portfolio course as an assessment tool of overall effectiveness of their MLS/MLIS programs.  

 


 

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John Brobst
jbrobst@fsu.edu
Doctoral candidate
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL USA


10.  Information Policy


Parity Lost: Federal Web Accessibility Policies Fail the Test


This study performs an analysis of the current United States federal policies that relate to website accessibility. Website accessibility means making the web useable by everyone whatever their ability or disability.  This study is a multi-method examination using a case study approach and a classical policy analysis approach called the side by side analysis. The case study examined 35 federal healthcare website homepages, finding that 8 had accessibility errors.  The implication is that 23% of these websites failed to be fully accessible as mandated by current federal web accessibility legislation. This evaluation indicates that the intent of federal web accessibility policy has not been fully achieved.  The second method of evaluation is a side-by-side analysis of the two legislative acts that most closely relate to federal web accessibility policy.  The information policies examined are the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by Section 508 in 1990.  This analysis revealed significant differences and conflicts in the ways these acts attempt to eliminate discrimination against individuals with disabilities.  The findings from this study led to recommendations for pursuing two interrelated options related to training development and an ongoing program of research activities.  These recommended policy options would help federal web managers to better comply with the intent of the existing legislation and to assure fully accessible federal government websites.  The federal government must increase its focus on assuring that all individuals can have fair and equal participation in the new Internet frontier.

 


 

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Janet L. Capps
jcapps@fsu.edu
Doctoral Candidate
Florida State University
College of Communication & Information
15. LIS Education and Programs

More Questions than Answers: Taking Stock of Early Literacy

The National Early Literacy Panel (NELP, 2008) task force reduced 8000+  hits to 500 relevant documents that could demonstrate correlational evidence between early literacy skills and later predictive literacy development. NELP’s concepts of phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, raid automatic naming (RAN) of letters, colors, and objects, and phonological memory are part of this theoretical approach known as emergent or early literacy (EL).

Public libraries are known to be expanding children services that extend EL learning opportunities. These collaborative services include working with young children, their families, caregivers, and local communities. Are librarians adequately trained in EL concepts? How effective are LIS courses in preparing practitioners with research-based EL concepts to fulfill a leadership role within their communities? A decade of fragmented EL LIS course offerings and library initiatives is indicative of the value behind the importance of addressing these questions.

 

The EL reading research community benefited from the NELP task force report. The LIS community needs to take stock of the EL knowledge levels of adult practitioners working in an environment with expectations of supporting literacy development of young children. This work discusses the EL-Capstone concept inventory instrument and seeks feedback from the LIS community on collaborative partnerships that will assist the field in establishing baselines. Perhaps existing EL training structure is effective but research is needed. Measuring capstone levels at which librarians are prepared to fulfill a leadership role in the community’s effort to impact emergent literacy development is paramount to future design and implementations of librarian training/intervention programs.

 

 


 

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Anthony S. Chow
aschow@uncg.edu
Assistant Professor
Department of Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Chase Baity
ccpalmer@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
Department of Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Christian Burris
cjburris@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
Department of Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

David Rachlin
djrachli@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
Department of Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Margaret Smith
masmi34@uncg.edu

MLIS Candidate
Department of Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

85. Administration and Management

 

To Fine or Not to Fine: Is Positive Reinforcement More Effective Than Overdue Fines?

 

The goal for libraries is simple: have people return books and resources on time so that the materials may be returned to circulation. Librarians view this as basic common sense and an expression of simple human decency. In reality, “remembering” when a resource is due is not usually a top priority for patrons. With the need to cultivate a positive perception becoming more critical as online resources become more popular and accessible, a major issue with people who do visit libraries is the overdue book fine.
But are fines the most effective means for influencing people to return resources on time? Though library fines can be profitable, the administration of fines also influences the experience of people who use library services. Fines can inadvertently create a confrontational dynamic for patrons that serve as a disincentive to use library services.  Patrons may discontinue use of a library to avoid the embarrassment of paying fines, or because they may be unable to pay fines.  


Our study’s aim is to discover if positive reinforcement for desired behaviors is an effective system for getting patrons to return materials in a timely fashion.  Our current sample size includes an academic library (n=60) and two elementary school library media programs (n=600).  A positive reinforcement system will create collaboration between patrons and employees, and foster a relationship of harmony rather than conflict. The implications of this study have the potential to significantly impact the field and society in general by changing the library and patron relationship.


 


 

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Anthony S. Chow
aschow@uncg.edu
Assistant Professor
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Department of Library and Information Studies

Jason Alston, MLIS
jkalsto3@uncg.edu
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Jackson Library Cataloging Department

 

Andrea Bottoms
albottom@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Department of Library and Information Studies

 

16. LIS Faculty, Students

 

Diversity and Retention in Librarianship: The Role of Advising and Mentoring

 

The sense of isolation and being misunderstood can be overwhelming at times combining to serve as a heavy weight of conflicting expectations, uncertainty, and unease that permeates one’s perspective on why the idea to go to library school was a good one in the first place. As one current student recently shared, “I think I've come into a discouraging little time in my library education, where I'm questioning the purpose of the degree.  It seems that no matter who I speak to in the profession, it's been an exercise in nay saying.   I guess I'll have to come by once I get more of a feeling of exactly where I want to go and therefore can make my own trail.” Students from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds bring with them unique perspectives and expectations that may not fit well within existing paradigms of the profession. Can advising and mentoring help?

 

Previous research suggests that support and mentoring are critical for students from underrepresented minority backgrounds so there is someone there to “show them the ropes” (Pelay, 2004) and help facilitate a “comfort zone” (Lipsey & Prendergast); this sense of understanding and community helps validate and welcome authentically diverse perspectives and ways of looking at and approaching the field differently.  Our poster presentation will provide first hand perspectives on the sense of isolation and feelings of doubt faced by many minority LIS students and practicing librarians and the crucial role mentoring and advising play.

 

 


 

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Anthony S. Chow
aschow@uncg.edu
Assistant Professor
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Department of Library and Information Studies

Jason Alston, MLIS
jkalsto3@uncg.edu
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Jackson Library Cataloging Department

Andrea Bottoms
albottom@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Department of Library and Information Studies

16: LIS Faculty, Students

 

The Role of Advising and Mentoring in Diversity and Retention in Librarianship

 

The sense of isolation and being misunderstood can be overwhelming at times combining to serve as a heavy weight of conflicting expectations, uncertainty, and unease that permeates one’s perspective on why the idea to go to library school was a good one in the first place. As one current student recently shared, “I think I've come into a discouraging little time in my library education, where I'm questioning the purpose of the degree.  It seems that no matter who I speak to in the profession, it's been an exercise in nay saying.   I guess I'll have to come by once I get more of a feeling of exactly where I want to go and therefore can make my own trail.” Students from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds bring with them unique perspectives and expectations that may not fit well within existing paradigms of the profession. Can advising and mentoring help?

 

Previous research suggests that support and mentoring are critical for students from underrepresented minority backgrounds so there is someone there to “show them the ropes” (Pelay, 2004) and help facilitate a “comfort zone” (Lipsey & Prendergast); this sense of understanding and community helps validate and welcome authentically diverse perspectives and ways of looking at and approaching the field differently.  Our poster presentation will provide first hand perspectives on the sense of isolation and feelings of doubt faced by many minority LIS students and practicing librarians and the crucial role mentoring and advising play.

 

 


 

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Anthony S. Chow
aschow@uncg.edu
Assistant Professor
Department of Library and Information Studies
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Marilyn Zamarripa
mszamarr@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Pamela Chappell
p_chappe@uncg.edu  
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Chase Baity
ccpalmer@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

David Rachlin
djrachli@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

C. Vinson
c_vinson@uncg.edu
MLIS Candidate
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro


74. Digital/ Virtual Libraries


When Real and Virtual Worlds Collide: A Second Life Library

 

A virtual world is a simulated environment, accessed by multiple users through an online interface, offering new opportunities for collaboration. Second Life (SL) is the best known virtual world. Volunteers created and supported virtual libraries with the primary goals of investigating library services in virtual worlds, attracting new users to the traditional library, and meeting librarians from around the world.  The most successful library initiatives in SL have been achieved primarily by library professionals collaborating in a freelance or pro bono fashion, not necessarily under or with a traditional library. As the role of libraries as collaborative spaces becomes more important, especially in educational institutions, should libraries establish virtual presences?

 

Studying virtual libraries with a usability theoretical framework can offer insight to their potential value, i.e. whether they can offer efficient, effective, and satisfying services.  These core usability factors can be analyzed for a virtual library in two prominent library user groups, for patrons receiving services and the library employees that deliver them.

 

This study represents one of the first attempts at understanding how to balance the needs and demands of real and virtual libraries within the framework of usability.  Our research involves a holistic approach from the perspectives of brick-and-mortar libraries, their virtual SL branches, and independent SL libraries.   Sample size includes approximately 50 participants representing both real and virtual worlds. Our poster will specify existing and potential alignment between user needs, how real and virtual libraries compliment them, and the overall management structure and related issues libraries face.

 

 


 

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Monica Colon- Aguirre
mcolonag@utk.edu
Information Sciences
School of Information Sciences
College of Communication & Information
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

 

Karen Freberg, M.A.
kfreberg@utk.edu
Doctoral Student:  Public Relations
School of Advertising and Public Relations
College of Communication & Information
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
76. Academic Libraries

 

A multidisciplinary case study analyzing Google’s key messages concerning the digitalization of books towards academic libraries

 

Ever since its inception a few years back Google’s initiative to digitize “every book ever published” and make it available free online has garnered a lot of attention from different sectors.  Some applaud this initiative and hail it as the ultimate open access initiative, others worry about the implications this could bring to institutions such as libraries, publishing houses and bookshops, all of which are in the book business one way or the other.  Although the initiative has encountered a few bumps in the road that have made its mission a little slower than originally intended such as copy right inflictions, Google is still going ahead with the project.  At the same time, the initiative that is commended by some as an effort to bring books to anyone around the planet and for bringing the advantages that this entails for purposes of digital preservation of materials to social equality that comes with making every book ever published a free commodity over the Internet, others worry about the future of libraries and the implications that the technology divide might have on the project’s ultimate goals.  This case study will center on the strategic key messages that Google is sending specifically to academic librarians as well as the possible implications of one corporation controlling such a great amount of information from a public relations and reputation management point of view as well as an information science vantage point.

 

 


 

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Andr de Souza Pena
andresouzapena@yahoo.com
Master
Federal University of Mato Grosso

 

Patrcia Marques de Arajo
patriciamarquesaraujo@hotmail.com
Bachelor
Federal University of Mato Grosso

 

Alexandre de Oliveira de Meira Gusmo
aomgusmao@hotmail.com
Master
Federal University of Mato Grosso
Continuing Education in LIS

 

The study of organizational commitment and the development of librarians in Mato Grosso

 

The study aims to map the degree of organizational commitment and the development of librarians of the Federal University of Mato Grosso. The work will examine the individual's relationship with the organization, intending to discuss in greater detail, the variables related to organizational commitment in its affective dimension, normative and instrumental. Regarding the commitment to career analysis will be given for participation in events, refresher courses, lectures, seminars, etc.. To this end, we intend to adopt the methodology of case study, and as a means of data collection a questionnaire, and interview with a portion of the sample, leaving out that the questionnaires will be sent to all staff of this University in a study. It is expected to portray what is the real commitment of librarians in relation to the profession and organization in which they operate.

 

 


 

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Kyong Eun Oh
keoh@eden.rutgers.edu
Doctoral Student
School of Communication and Information
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey


60. Knowledge/IR Management

 

Collaborating through Topic Map for Knowledge Management (TMKM)

 

This study aims to propose a topic model for knowledge management that would facilitate collaboration in any organization. Proposed model, Topic Maps for Knowledge Management (TMKM), has four core elements that are topic, types of knowledge, association and occurrence. This model is developed based on the existing topic map, which is the international standardization that provides a way to represent information about structure of information resources (ISO 13250, 2002). Existing topic map model have many strong traits in organizing information resources; however, it does not reflect characteristics of knowledge that it is ineffective in organizing knowledge artifacts for knowledge management. The proposed model, TMKM, is designed to reflect critical characteristics of knowledge. First of all, it lies emphasize on people who have knowledge about certain topics or issues. In addition, it stresses new ideas and opinions. Secondly, TMKM handles both explicit and tacit knowledge by providing environments that facilitate externalization of tacit knowledge and combination of explicit knowledge (Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995). Thirdly, it supports creation and sharing of declarative, procedural and causal knowledge (Zack, 1999). Proposed model, TMKM is expected to contribute to effective knowledge management that will accordingly facilitate establishment of collaboration in any institution.

 

References
International Standards Organization ([ISO], 2002). ISO/IEC 13250- Topic maps. Retrieved March 9, 2009, from www.y12.doe.gov/sgml/sc34/document/0322_files/iso13250-2nd-ed-v2.pdf

Nonaka, I. & Takeuchi, H. (1995). The Knowledge-Creating Company. New York: Oxford University Press.

Zack, M.H. (1999). Managing codified knowledge. Sloan Management Review, 40 (4), 45-58.  

 

 


 

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Kasey Garrison
kgarriso@odu.edu
Graduate Teaching Assistant

Dr. Gail Dickinson
gdickins@odu.edu
Associate Professor

 

Dr. Carol Doll
cdoll@odu.edu
Professor and Graduate Program Director

Library Science Program
Department of Teaching and Learning
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, Virginia


15. LIS Education and Programs

 

The Role of Inter-Organizational Collaboration Theory in the Development of a Library Information Science Education Program

This research focuses on the development and application of a collaboration model to facilitate the creation of an American Library Association (ALA) accredited library and information science (LIS) program in Virginia.  Preliminary survey results from academic and public library directors confirmed that they see a need for this type of program.  Support from this constituency is vital in the establishment of any new masters program, especially given the current economic crisis.  A broad search of the professional literature identified some case studies of successful collaborations, including the Wilder Collaboration Factors Inventory (WCFI) as developed by the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation.  WCFI identifies twenty factors in six categories that influence the success of collaborative interactions:  
the environment,
? membership characteristics of the groups involved,
process and structure of the interactions,
communication among group members,
purpose and vision, and
resources.


As a first step, researchers are examining case studies from the literature about collaboration in organizations and in public schools to determine how WCFI is reflected in those real world situations. The ultimate goal is to use WCFI as a foundation to facilitate collaboration among the researchers and academic and public library directors so that everyone can be involved in the evolution of a new ALA accredited LIS program in Virginia. To date, researchers have begun this process, and anticipate the plan will be fully developed by May 2010.

 

Mattessich, P. W., et. al.  (2001).  Collaboration:  What Makes It Work?  St. Paul, MN:  Amherst H. Wilder Foundation.

 

 


 

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Carolyn Hank
hcarolyn@email.unc.edu
Doctoral Student
School of Information and Library Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
CB 3360, 100 Manning Hall
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3360

Helen R. Tibbo
tibbo@ils.unc.edu
Professor
School of Information and Library Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
CB 3360, 100 Manning Hall
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3360

17: Pedagogy in LIS

 

Applying Digital Curation Principles in Practical Settings: A Framework for Implementing Field Experiences from the DigCCurr Project

 

In the past decade, there has been tremendous growth in digital curation professional opportunities for information and library science graduates. To train students to fill these new professional roles, there is a need for education to address the necessary competencies for managing digital collections. In response, the DigCCurr (Digital Curation Curriculum) project, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), has developed a graduate-level curricular framework, course modules, and experiential components to prepare students for digital curation in various environments. This poster reports on the development, implementation and outcomes of the project’s Carolina Digital Curation Fellowship (CDCF) program’s practicum component over a two-year period (2007-09), drawn from the following data collection activities:

 

1) Practicum agreement forms, establishing learning objectives and product goals;
2) Interim and year-end evaluations by practicum supervisors;
3) Interim and year-end evaluations by Fellows;
4) Informal focus groups with information settings’ practicum supervisors;
5) Informal focus groups with Fellows; and
6) Testimonials as a cumulative CDCF program evaluation by the Fellows.

 

It is our hope that the findings reported in this poster, as well as openly available documentation for managing practical components, will benefit educators in diverse organizational settings by sharing exemplars of opportunities and strategies for successful identification and implementation of practical digital curation learning experiences, and strategies for incorporating digital curation practices and policies into existing organizational practices. Through adoption of appropriate supervised and relevant experiential components, students can be prepared to serve in digital curatorial roles after graduating.

 

 


 

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John B. Harer, PhD
harerj@ecu.edu
Assistant Professor of Library Science
Department of Library Science
Mail Stop 172
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858


86: Personnel and 90: Evaluation of Service


Employees as Customers Judging Quality: Enhancing Employee Assessment


The purpose of this study has been to investigate current practices in employee satisfaction assessment to determine if quality in the production of library work systems are being assessed from the employees’ perspective. It is grounded in the theorety that customers judge quality and that employees are internal customers equally important to assessment efforts as are external customers. Employees provide a unique perspective to the assessment of quality that external customers cannot provide. Quality assessment needs to be an additional form of employee assessment from that of employee satisfaction or organizational climate initiatives. Methodology: The initial study began with a content analysis of specific items within organizational climate surveys gathered from Association of Research Libraries. Research Implications: This research seeks to develop this type of employee assessment by first refining and validating the identification of specific assessment items, including those discovered in the content analysis, and a continued review of quality assessment literature, through a Delphi review of an array of items developed in this manner. Piloting of these specific items as part of an assessment instrument, tested for validity and reliability for assessment, will follow and extend this study into the eventual creation of an assessment instrument gauging quality in academic library services and processes from an employee perspective, possibly enhancing current organizational culture and climate assessment initiatives. Originality/Value: This study contends that quality assessment is different than employee satisfaction assessment, but significantly enhances employee assessment in general that benefits both the library and its employees.  

 


 

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Tina Inzerilla
tina.inzerilla@gmail.com
Doctoral candidate
Queensland University of Technology/San Jose State University


76. Academic Libraries


Academic and library faculty collaboration:  A social network analysis


Collaboration between academic and library faculty is an important topic of discussion and research among academic librarians.  This research will develop an understanding of academic collaborators by analyzing academic faculty’s teaching social network.  Academic faculty will be interviewed to gain insight into why library faculty are an integral part of some teaching networks and not others.   This research would supplement the existing research on collaboration and would provide both academic and library faculty with added insight into their relationships.  These partnerships between academic and library faculty are vital for enabling students to become information literate by providing the knowledge they need to access resources.  A goal of college education is to create information literate lifelong learners.

 

 


 

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Melissa P. Johnston
mpj07@fsu.edu
Doctoral Student
Florida State University


77. School Media Centers/Libraries

 

Enablers and Barriers to Technology Leadership for the School Library Media Specialist

 

School library media specialists (SLMS) are expected to accept and fulfill numerous roles in their daily practice; one of these roles is that of leader, especially in the area of technology integration. The guidelines from the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), the National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), all mention the role of technology leadership when defining the responsibilities of the SLMS. In 2009, AASL released new guidelines for school library media programs that reiterate the belief that the SLMS should act as a leader to ensure that learners are equipped with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in the technological society of the 21st century.
Despite the abundance of literature suggesting the need for the SLMS to be a leader in technology integration, this role is one that has been mostly ignored in the research arena and left as undefined for practicing SLMS, leading to uncertainty concerning how SLMS meet these standards and fulfill this role. This exploratory study will seek to identify and investigate the enablers and barriers that practicing SLMS are experiencing in relation to the leadership role in technology integration through analyzing survey data.  The overall goal of this research is to better prepare future media specialists and to support practicing SLMS by contributing to their understanding of how to carry out this vital and evolving role.

 

 


 

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Mary Wilkins Jordan
mary.wilkinsjordan@simmons.edu
Assistant Professor
Simmons College
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
300 Fenway
Boston, MA 02115

#86 Personnel

 

Can’t Get No Satisfaction? Come Work at the Library!

 

What causes people to be satisfied in their jobs? What makes librarians look forward to going to work every day? Knowing this could help those in the LIS field spread around the happiness, and to use these things as tools in recruiting new librarians to our profession.


This study will use Q Method to rank the qualitative areas of satisfaction librarians feel at work, then performing statistical analysis to translate their rankings into groupings of librarians sharing similar interests in their professional lives. Although this project is in an early stage, it has potential to help in recruiting good people to the profession, once areas of satisfaction are identified and can be conveyed to prospective librarians.

 

 


 

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Allison G. Kaplan
agkaplan@wisc.edu
Associate Faculty Associate
School of Library and Information Studies
University of Wisconsin – Madison
4263 H.C. White Hall
600 N. Park St.
Madison WI 53706


15. LIS Education and Programs

 

Community Engagement In LIS Education

 

This poster will present preliminary research on the impact of service-learning projects on a portion of University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) students. The UW-Madison SLIS program has included a practical field experience for its students since the late 1920’s. In recent years, however, there has been an interest in the area of service-learning in LIS education. For SLIS, service-learning is defined as an experience working within a community that is not necessarily supervised by a practicing librarian, as opposed to the field experience that must be supervised by a practicing librarian.  In the fall of 2008, the SLIS course, Public Library Services to Children and Young Adults, included within the course meeting time the opportunity for SLIS students to work with children in grades K-3 in a local after school program. Data from student surveys showed that this time provided an invaluable experience for the students but took too much time from the course content. By the fall of 2009, the SLIS program had created a separate, one-credit, course titled “Topics in Community Engagement.” The first “topic” also focused on the children in this after school program but with additional support and collaboration from the Madison Public Library Readmobile program. Early data from this fall semester is suggesting that students, the public library, and the children in the after school program are all benefiting from this community work opportunity.  Research to be discussed will include analysis of data from both the 2008 and 2009 classes.

 

 


 

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Ji-Hyun Kim
Jk06k@fsu.edu
Doctoral student
Florida State University
College of Communication and Information


19. Distance Education in LIS

 

Gap between Information Demand and Availability of Asians in U.S.

 

Introduction

As our society becomes more and more culturally and ethnically diverse, information studies need to respond to information seeking influenced by cultural diversity. Several cultural studies have already revealed that individuals’ information behavior varies between cultures.
Purpose of the study


There has not been sufficient study exploring cultural differences in information seeking behavior. Previous studies have compared information sources and how they are used in various cultures, but did not compare the information behavior and how individual users sought information, and what kind of results they experienced in their everyday life. In addition, comparing with well-developed studies of Americans and African Americans’ information seeking behavior, few studies have reported information seeking behavior of Asians. Therefore, this research focuses on Asian individual users, how they seek information, and what kind of results they experience in their everyday life.

Research Questions
The above studies and discussion lead to the following three research questions:
(a) What types of information do Asians seek in their everyday lives?
(b) What information media do Asian favor?
(c) What people sources do Asians favor when seeking everyday life information?

Methodology
The present study will employ three data collection methods: written activity logs, intensive interview, survey. An activity logs are the tools in which participants can record questions that arise for them each day and indicate where and from what source they seek information. The interview uses semi-structured open-ended questions in order to find complete answers for research questions. Survey includes supplementary questions which are not examined by the two other methods.

 

 


 

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Inna Kouper
inkouper@indiana.edu
Doctoral Candidate
School of Library and Information Science
Indiana University

 

Howard Rosenbaum
hrosenba@indiana.edu
Associate Professor of Information Science
School of Library and Information Science
Indiana University

 

3. LIS as a Discipline

 

From sociology to information studies: Patterns of theory importation

 

Theories, concepts, and methods routinely cross disciplinary boundaries. Murray and Evers (1989) define this practice as theory borrowing, i.e., “taking a concept or theory out of its original social and historical context and using it in another to explain the same or a different social or natural phenomenon.” Recent studies demonstrate that the field of information studies borrows theories from different disciplines of social science and humanities (Pettigrew and McKechnie, 2001). But what are the patterns of borrowing from particular disciplines? This poster reports the findings of a study that looked into patterns of borrowing from sociology by examining the content and citations of five volumes of the Annual Review of Information Science and Technology.

 

Our findings show that the ways sociological content is incorporated into information studies are quite diverse and eclectic. Researchers draw on a variety of theoretical frameworks, yet they rarely incorporate theories as a whole. Rather, they seek out particular theoretical statements, concepts, or empirical observations that can help them to support their research on information. For example, they can refer to the whole domain (e.g., sociology of knowledge) as their theoretical orientation. Or employ a particular concept (e.g., social capital) to test certain relationships. Information studies researchers also tend to rely on the importation work of others, i.e., those who already re-worked sociological theory and appropriated it for the purposes of information studies. Thus, Rob Kling is one of the most frequently cited authors in the context of sociological concepts and information studies. Classic sociologists such as K. Marx, R. Merton, N. Luhman, and A. Giddens are mentioned much less frequently.


References
Murray, J. B., Evers, D. J. (1989). Theory borrowing and reflectivity in interdisciplinary fields (pp. 647-652). In Srull, T.K. Advances in Consumer Research. Provo, UT: Association for Consumer Research. Pettigrew, K. E., & McKechnie, L. (. (2001). The use of theory in information science research. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 52(1), 62-73.

 

 


 

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Hyungkyu Kwon, Ph.D.
Kyungsung University, South Korea

 

Problem-based EEG Neurofeedback Training Model for Successful Online Education

 

This study developed the electroencephalography(EEG) training model by analyzing the differences between the problem-based learning steps and brain hemispheric lateralization variables to generate successful online education. This study constructs the effective problem-based training through the EEG neurofeedback by applying PBL ( problem-based learning) by the functional characteristics of the brain function. It was discovered that the optimal brainwave control is possible by the problem-based neurofeedback training.   

 

This research proposed a set of systematic procedures for the EEG neurofeedback for the online instruction applying problem-based Neurofeedback training. This online training involves the situation where the instructor applies neurofeedback modalities towards the satisfactory teaching of the student.

 

In this model, the problem-based training procedures for the student adaptation to the successful education are mainly considered. This model consists of 8 phases: the problem establishment, the brain based examination of symptoms, the problem-based examination of students, the integrated interaction for the instruction, the clarification of the problem, the training procedure establishment, the verification of the mutual role, the training evaluation for the next instruction.  
This model helps students to enhance self-directed regulation for better instruction.

 

 


 

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Chris Landbeck
clandbeck@fsu.edu
Doctoral Candidate
School of Library and Information Studies,
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306


5. Philosophy, Values, and Ethics of LIS

 

The Nature of Information: A Novel Approach

 

This study seeks to define the nature of information in two steps: first, to gather and analyze definitions of “information” and related concepts for frequently occurring terms; second, to use those terms found to be prevalent to describe these concepts. In this way, it is hoped that appropriate terms and definitions will be derived, leading to a greater understanding of the world around us and to better, more efficient communication between disparate research areas, and a greater sense of what “information science” is and what it deals with. 44 undergraduates were asked to describe the difference, if any, between data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. The resulting essays were analyzed for passage that commented on these terms, and the passages were then labeled with an eye toward bringing similar passages together. To date, results show that subjects not only comment on the nature of the four aforementioned terms, but on the transition between one and another; that any of the four items asked about need not be true or accurate; that there is some disagreement on several of the derived terms; and that results of this research can serve as a base for a discussion about the nature of information. This poster seeks to supplement that data already gathered, using a different set of subjects and a different milieu to validate the results from the first part of the research.

 

Indication of special needs: The use of non-standard materials in the poster (whiteboard).

 

 


 

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Dorian Mari-Elizabeth Lange
dmhr25@mail.missouri.edu
PhD Student, Information Science
University of Missouri: Columbia


5.  Philosophy, Values, and Ethics of LIS

Librarians and Journalists: Their Shared Ethical Purpose

 

This poster explores the connection of the principles, values, and ethics of information that both librarians and journalists strive to uphold.  This exploration will focus on three primary parallels.  


First, both professions share the duty to objectively provide information to cultivate an informed public.  Journalists largely try to provide objective information, while librarians emulate that ideal by striving to provide a well-rounded collection that offers materials that are representative of a multitude of viewpoints.  
Secondly, both must reject paternalistic influences that inhibit their responsibilities to the public.  External pressures from citizens and forces of government, and internal coercion are problems that both professions must be vigilant to proactively prevent and reactively contest.
Third, both struggle to protect the privacy of those they work with and serve. Just as librarians protect the records of their patrons, so too do journalists protect the sources of their information.  

 

This poster will ultimately attempt to demonstrate the ethical similarities in the foundations of both professions and further promote the edification and collaboration that will encourage the education of librarians to include working with journalists to uphold our shared values.  

 

In later research, using the above as a foundation, I will examine the pragmatic practical applicability of the actual collaboration of librarians and journalists, and further analyze how these communities could both benefit by their unification on shared ethical ideals.  This will ultimately culminate in positing that library education should include instruction in the necessity of collaboration across disciplines to promote and preserve shared purposes and goals.

 

 


 

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Jung A Lee
jal05m@fsu.edu
Doctoral Student
College of Communication & Information
Florida State University

 

Kathleen Burnett, Ph.D
College of Communication & Information
Florida State University

 

Mia Liza A. Lustria, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
College of Communication & Information
Florida State University

 

Curriculum development for consumer health informatics in Library and Information Studies Programs

 

Increasing numbers of people are using the Internet to access health information (Sonnenberg, 2004; Wilkins, 2001). The increasing use of the Internet for researching health information has resulted in the emerging field of health informatics (Thomas, 2003). Library and Information Science [LIS] has provided the theoretical and philosophical foundation for several courses of consumer health informatics (Eysenbach, 2000). Integrating health informatics into the LIS curriculum will enable health information to be effectively disseminated and more easily understood by consumers. This proposed study will be supported by curriculum development theory, which will provide the framework for comprehensive curriculum development within current consumer health informatics courses (Hilda, 1964). This study will analyze the current courses of consumer health informatics within LIS programs by analyzing the curriculums of top five LIS schools based on the U.S. News and World Report (2009). Using Delphi study survey methods, faculty from LIS programs and health information providers will be surveyed concerning curriculum development (Wildemuth, 2009). With the goal of exploring current consumer health informatics courses in LIS programs and comparing each school’s curriculum in order to find what is lacking, this study will inform LIS educators and health information providers of current curriculum trends, and will suggest ways to develop the curriculum of consumer health informatics in the field of LIS.


Problem statement
LIS is an interdisciplinary field that has several emerging fields, including consumer health informatics. Only a few LIS programs have integrated health informatics into the curriculum. Further curriculum development within consumer health informatics will lead to connections between each individual field and will require advanced courses such as health information resources, health informatics, and medical record systems. This study will suggest and develop guidelines for curriculum development for consumer health informatics in LIS. Furthermore, the curriculum will integrate advanced courses of consumer health informatics in existing LIS programs.
This study will address the following research questions, which are focused on how the LIS programs are improved by the integration of consumer health informatics courses:


1) How are the curriculums of the top five LIS programs designed to incorporate Consumer Health Informatics?
2) What is lacking within these curriculums?
3) What are the main challenges being faced in current curriculums that include consumer health informatics within LIS?
4) How can the current curriculums of consumer health informatics be developed into the integrated curriculums of consumer health informatics within LIS?
5) What are suggestions to develop the curriculum of consumer health informatics in LIS using Delphi study method?  


References
Eysenbach, G. (2000). Consumer health informatics. British Medical Journal, 320, 1713-1716.
Hilda, T. (1964). Curriculum development: Theory and Practice. New York, John Wiley.
Sonnenberg, F. A. (2004). Health information on the Internet: opportunities and pitfalls. Archives of Internal Medicine, 157, 151–152.
Thomas, L. (2003). The arrival of the Internet. Nursing Standard, 12(21), 15-23.
Wildemuth, B. M. (2009). Applications of social research methods to questions in information and library science. New York: Wiley.
Wilkins, A. S. (2001). Expanding Internet access for health care consumers. Health Care Management, 24, 30–41.

 

 


 

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Lauren H. Mandel
lmandel@fsu.edu
Doctoral Candidate
Florida State University
College of Communication and Information

Katherine H. Weimer
k-weimer@tamu.edu
Associate Professor, Coordinator of Map and GIS Collections and Services
University Libraries, Texas A&M University

 

15. LIS Education and Programs

 

Necessary Skills for Map and GIS Librarians: Job Descriptions to Inform LIS Curriculum

 

The ALA Map and Geography Round Table (MAGERT) recently published core competencies for map, geographic information systems (GIS), and cataloging/metadata librarians (2008).  Together, these types of librarians may be called geographic information librarians (GILs).  MAGERT members, experts in the GIL field, developed these competencies based on professional observation of skills required in GILs jobs.  However, no formal research has detailed the skills required and preferred in GIS and map librarian job announcements, although such research has occurred in other LIS specialties such as cataloging (Park, Lu, & Marion, 2009).  Weimer and Reehling (2006) identify the need for research into GIL job announcements, suggesting content analysis can provide one view of GIL job requirements and fill a knowledge gap in the LIS curricular literature, which does not include geographic information curricular research.


The project in progress has the following objectives: (1) identify skills and knowledge required for GILs, based on GIL job descriptions, (2) validate the MAGERT core competencies for map, GIS, and cataloging/metadata librarians, (3) inform GIL curriculum development in LIS, and (4) encourage LIS to include a GIL focus within its curriculum.  To best address these objectives, the project entails a formal content analysis of map and GIS librarian job postings from the Maps-L, GOVDOC-L, and Geonet listserves to identify the skills required and preferred by those hiring GILs.  Content analysis is ongoing, using a coding scheme based on MAGERT’s categories of core competencies, and both intra- and inter-coder reliability tests will be conducted.

 

References
MAGERT Education Committee. (2008). Map, GIS and cataloging/metadata librarian core competencies [Electronic resource]. Chicago: American Library Association. Retrieved February 12, 2009, from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/rts/magert/news/index.cfm
Park, J., Lu, C., & Marion, L. (2009). Cataloging professionals in the digital environment: a content analysis of job descriptions. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 60(4), 844-857. Retrieved April 17, 2009, from Wiley InterScience database.
Weimer, K. H., & Reehling, P. (2006). A new model of geographic information librarianship: description, curriculum and program proposal. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 47(4), 291-302.

 

 


 

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Joanne Gard Marshall, PhD
marshall@ils.unc.edu
UNC School of Information and Library Science and Institute on Aging
720 MLK JR BLVD
CB #1030
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1030

 

Jennifer Craft Morgan, PhD
UNC Institute on Aging

 

Victor W. Marshall, PhD
UNC Department of Sociology and Institute on Aging

 

Deborah Barreau, PhD
School of Information and Library Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Barbara Moran, PhD
School of Information and Library Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Paul Solomon, PhD
School of Library and Information Science
College of Mass Communications and Information Studies
University of South Carolina
UNC Institute on Aging

 

Susan Rathbun Grubb, MAT, MLS
UNC School of Information and Library Science and Institute on Aging

 

Cheryl A. Thompson
UNC Institute on Aging  

 

15. LIS Education and Programs

 

Workforce Issues in Library and Information Science 2 (WILIS 2): Preliminary Results from the Recent Graduates Survey

 

WILIS 2 is an IMLS funded project designed to implement an alumni survey that all Library and Information Science (LIS) program can potentially use with their recent graduates. LIS programs have generally lacked the time and resources to systematically survey their graduates. As a result, stakeholders lack an adequate understanding of what happens to graduates. Educators, in particular, do not have ongoing data about the extent to which their programs meet students’ expectations, prepare them for the workplace or meet continuing learning needs. Such an understanding will assist in educating and managing the LIS workforce more effectively. The WILIS 2 project builds on WILIS 1, a comprehensive study of career patterns of graduates of LIS programs in North Carolina. In WILIS 2, a community based participatory research approach was taken to revising the recent graduates portion of the WILIS 1 survey so that is suitable for use by all LIS programs. The web-based survey gathers data on the educational and work histories of the respondents, continuing education needs, satisfaction with LIS as a career, perspectives of recent graduates about their LIS programs and demographics. A pilot test of the WILIS 2 survey was conducted with eight LIS programs in Spring 2009. The overall response rate was 54% (n=1025) with individual program response rates ranging from 35% to 79%. This poster will summarize the key findings from the pilot survey. Up to 35 programs will participate in the full launch of the survey in 2009-2010. For more information, please visit www.wilis.unc.edu

 

 


 

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Eileen McElrath
rmcelrath@mail.twu.edu
Assistant Professor in School of Library and Information Studies
Texas Woman’s University

 

Information Literacy and Instruction

 

Utilizing Adult Learning Theory in Information Literacy Instruction and Library and Information Science Courses in the Digital Age.   

 

Abstract:  This is beginning work whose purpose is a review of the literature about Adult Learning Theory and the development of specific teaching strategies useful for librarians teaching information literacy sessions for adult learners. The strategies will be useful for Library and Information Science (LIS) faculty teaching graduate courses as well. There is much written in educational literature about Adult Learning Theory. There is a gap, however, when searching LIS literature. Adult Learning Theory gains importance in view of the increasing numbers of adults in colleges. Additionally, LIS education consists of graduate students who are, for the most part, adult learners. Adults learn differently than younger people for many reasons. According to Ralph C. Kennedy, M.Ed. ‘Adults differ distinctly in terms of such factors as motivation, interest, values, attitudes, physical and mental abilities, and learning histories’ (Kennedy, 2003). Malcolm Knowles, developer of Adult Learning Theory, describes his Principles of Adult Learning:


1. Adults are autonomous and self-directed.   
2. Adults have accumulated a foundation of life experiences and knowledge that may include work-related activities, family responsibilities, and previous education. They need to connect knowledge to this knowledge/experience base.  
3. Adults are goal oriented.  
4. Adults are relevancy-oriented.
5. Adults are practical.  
6.   Adults need to be shown respect.  

 

Using Adult Learning Theory becomes especially important in the online environment—an environment quite different from face-to-face library instruction and graduate courses. This research will offer practical teaching strategies targeted for adult learners.  Comments and suggestions from conference attendees will be much appreciated.  

Kennedy, Ralph C. “Applying Principles of Adult Learning: The Key to More Effective Training
Programs.” FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin. 2003.
Knowles, Malcolm. The Adult Learner: A Neglected Species.  4th ed. Houston: Gulf Publishing Co. 1990

 

 


 

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Patricia Montiel Overall
overall@u.arizona.edu
Associate Professor
University of Arizona
School of Information Resources and Library Science


43. Services for Multicultural Populations

 

Assessing Information Literacy of 3rd and 4th Grade Latino Students: A Preliminary Report.

 

This poster presents preliminary findings from an instrument developed through an IMLS research grant to study the effect of teacher and librarian collaboration on science information literacy for Latino students.   The instrument, Children’s Information Literacy Evaluation (CHILE), was given to over 700 third and fourth grade Latino students in public schools in the southwest as a pre- and post-assessment.   Standard procedures for survey development were followed including item identification, iterative expert panel review of items, student focus groups, teacher-librarian discussions, and pilot testing of the instrument.  Items selected for the instrument reflect the nine Information Literacy Standards proposed in Information Power (1998) and The Standards for the 21st Century Learner (American Association of School Librarians, 2007).  The instrument is a 22-item pencil and paper instrument. The instrument was read in English to students in their regular classroom setting.   Students who participated in the study during the 2008-2009 school year were primarily from low income Spanish speaking families.   Institutional Review Board procedures for data collection were followed including parent consent and student assent in English and Spanish.   Validity and reliability will be reported.   Results from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) procedures and analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical procedures will also be reported.  The scores of students who were in classes of teachers participating in an intervention in the IMLS grant funded study as well as scores of students of control teachers in the IMLS study will be presented.  Scores were examined to determine whether significant differences between groups existed.

 

 


 

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Hea Lim Rhee
hlr8@pitt.edu
University of Pittsburgh
Doctoral Candidate


82. Archives and Records Centers

 

The Relationship between Archival Appraisal Practice and the User Study in U.S. State Archives and Records Management Programs

 

As the quantity of records has experienced explosive growth, the significance of archival appraisal has increased. Many archival studies recommend the disposal of useless records in order to save archives’ resources for processing and preserving records and enhancing users’ access.


However, the role of use as an archival appraisal factor  has been a topic of continuous argument among appraisal researchers, particularly since the 1980s. Though some appraisal researchers and user study researchers have agreed that applying user studies in appraisal practice is feasible and valuable, they have done so strictly from their own perspectives. As a result, there has been little research bridging the gap between archival appraisal and the user study. Even after thirty years of debate, little is known about actual application of user studies in archival appraisal practice.


The purpose of this study is to explore, for the first time, the relationship between archival appraisal practice and the user study in U.S. state archives and records management programs. This study will examine not only the current application of user studies to appraisal practice but also attitudes of state archivists and records managers toward the feasibility and value of user studies.


This study will collect and analyze data quantitatively and qualitatively by employing mixed methods: an online survey and telephone or in-person interviews. The participants will be the archivists and records managers conducting archival appraisal practice in archives and records management programs from all fifty states and the District of Columbia.

 

 


 

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Angela R. Sample
ars3k9@mail.missouri.edu
PhD Candidate
School of Information Science and Learning Technologies
University of Missouri
Columbia, Missouri


16. LIS Faculty, Students


Lifelong Learning: Investigating Transference of Information Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills


Recently, university library use courses have increased attention on developing information literacy skills. In the ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards, the profession affirmed that “Information literacy forms the basis for lifelong learning. It is common to all disciplines, to all learning environments, and to all levels of education.” (ACRL, 2006). Furthermore, the profession recognizes that information literacy skills are not limited to academic achievement, and are transferrable and essential to all aspects of life:

 

By ensuring that individuals have the intellectual abilities of reasoning and critical thinking, […] colleges and universities provide the foundation for continued growth throughout their careers, as well as in their roles as informed citizens and members of communities (ACRL, 2006).

 

Although information literacy skills are a key target outcome of library use courses, very little research has been conducted regarding whether students transfer these skills to information needs in other coursework and everyday life. This study will explore the question of students’ transference of these skills by means of ethnographic research incorporating in-depth interviews with and observation of students enrolled in one such course and follow-up interviews the semester following completion of the course. The interviews will seek to ascertain if the course enables students to make informed decisions relating to personal finances, political awareness, career plans, etc. The interviews will also ask if the information literacy course prepares them to succeed in other courses, particularly in the realm of framing questions, evaluating informational resources, and incorporating the work of others into their thinking.


References

Association of College and Research Libraries. (2006, Sep. 1). Information literacy competency standards for higher education. American Library Association. Retrieved April 16, 2009 from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm Document ID: 185693

 

 


 

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Kathleen Schisa, MSLIS
kbschisa@syr.edu
Syracuse University, WISE Consortium
MSLIS Graduate


19. Distance Education in LIS

 

An Education in collaboration: Lessons learned from course development partnerships among WISE schools and associations

 

WISE+ supports partnerships that enable WISE schools and LIS associations to collaborate to develop courses suitable for graduate credit and continuing education. Course topics reflect current issues in the associations’ specialties, and many courses are taught by practicing librarians with robust subject expertise. Students gain valuable exposure to professional associations, and associations have the opportunity to influence the education of current and future constituents. The result is a dynamic classroom where LIS students and professionals network, share ideas, and promote the discussion of the future of the discipline.

This poster features WISE+ partnership models, including lessons learned by the host institution and association. A rationale for potential future partnerships including sustainability plans is also presented.

 

Model 1: Course is developed and taught by an association member for graduate and continuing education credit, with input and approval from the host school. (American Theological Library Association and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Theological Librarianship)

Model 2: Month-long course delivered via YouTube is developed by a WISE faculty member. Video lectures are freely available to the entire partner association and to the public (American Library Association and Syracuse University, Gaming in Libraries)
Model 3: Collective demand among WISE schools justifies an additional section of an existing course (Palinet and University of Pittsburgh, Museum Archives)

Model 4: School partners with multiple organizations to offer an existing elective for continuing education and graduate credit (American Indian Library Association, REFORMA and San Jose State University, Services to Racially and Ethnically Diverse Communities)

Special Needs: None

 

 


 

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Susan E. Searing
searing@illinois.edu
University Library and Graduate School of Library & Information Science
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Associate Professor


Area 76, Academic Libraries


Transforming the “Librarian’s Library”: A Case Study of Change.


At the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, a system of distributed, departmental libraries has been in place since the 19th century.  A separate Library & Information Science (LIS) Library was housed in the Main Library facility from the 1920s until May 2009, when its collections were merged into other libraries.  The new model for LIS library services combines a more robust virtual presence with an intensified human presence in the GSLIS building.  The changes in LIS library services are part of a much larger initiative to create a more flexible organizational structure for the University Library that recognizes the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of academic inquiry, the critical importance of digital information resources, and the opportunities for collaborative approaches to the provision of library services and collections.  This case study of a change process that is still “in progress” focuses on the use of evidence about user behavior and needs (both quantitative and qualitative data) to support decision-making, planning, and evaluation. The transformation of the LIS Library demonstrates how a successful transition from a traditional service model to a new one can be grounded in knowledge of the unique needs and customs of the library, university, and population of users.  The next step of the process is to develop an assessment strategy that is likewise evidence-based.  Because the University of Illinois LIS collection is among the best in North America, its fate is relevant to LIS scholars worldwide.  
Indication of special needs:  Desirable, but not essential: a small table or stand for a laptop computer, if internet access is available.

 


 

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Brooke Shannon
bms5yc@mizzou.edu
Doctoral Student
School of Information and Learning Technologies
University of Missouri


49. Information Literacy and Instruction

 

Using photography to enhance information literacy

 

My research proposal uses photography to explore women’s information literacy process. The primary reason for incorporating photography to explore information literacy is to allow participants to actively engage with information during all stages of the project through gathering, creating, describing, and sharing information. The broad research questions are: 1) What kinds of information do women identify as relevant to their daily lives? 2) What kind of relevant information do women choose to share with others people? 3) How are daily experiences described and communicated to other people within and outside the community? 4) How can creative expression through photography be used to develop and apply participants’ ability to acquire, evaluate, and use information and to create, interpret, and communicate information? Participants will be asked to create images to which they relate; use literacy skills to communicate the meaning of their photographs by creating keywords and descriptions; and share the meaning of their photographs with other people via an online photography application. This project is an ethnographic study that focuses holistically on the participants’ personal experiences, considers the cultural and social context. Although results of this project are limited to a select group and not generalizable to a larger population, the findings can be used to inform future studies on information literacy in Kenya and developing nations.

 

 


 

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Cherri Shelnutt
cshelnutt@twu.edu
Doctoral candidate
School of Library and Information Studies
Texas Woman’s University
Denton, TX 76204


19. Distance Education in LIS

 

An Exploration of the Experiences of Pioneering Online Library and Information Science Graduate Students: A Mixed Methods Study of Students in the 1990s


This researcher is exploring early library and information science (LIS) online graduate courses from the perspective of the pioneering students who took such courses from any of the American Library Association-accredited schools and programs during the 1990s.  The current study seeks to gather stories and experiences from some of the students who took at least one LIS graduate course online during the 1990s, a time reflecting growing use of this form of educational delivery in our field.  
This mixed methods design uses an online questionnaire with both quantitative and qualitative components, gathering statistics and stories about the experiences of these early student participants.  Answers to closed-ended questions will provide descriptive information about some aspects of the early LIS online graduate experience from a student perspective. In addition, responses to open-ended questions will be analyzed using qualitative techniques to identify themes.  Finally, the researcher will compare and contrast all results to interpret the varied but complimentary data.  The resulting conclusions will add to our knowledge about LIS education in general and the early years of LIS online learning in particular.  
The online questionnaire is available through March, 2010, and all persons who took at least one online LIS graduate course from an ALA-accredited school or program during the 1990s are invited to participate. A website for this research project is available at www.lisonline1990s.com and includes a link to the online survey questionnaire.

 


 

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Scott Alan Smith
Scott.alan.smith@comcast.net
Master's student
Emporia State University

 

Dr. Loriene Roy
loriene@ischool.utexas.edu
Professor
School of Information
The University of Texas at Austin

 

22: Acquisitions Theory and Practice
15: LIS Education and Programs

 

Gaining Competency in Acquisitions and Collection Development: A Schema for Preparing Entry Level Information Professionals for 21st Century Library Needs

 

Library acquisitions and collection development practices have evolved from the identification and purchase of primarily print resources such as monographs and journals to making acquisitions decisions that consider an array of information packaging offering library patrons a diverse blend of print, media, and digital products. Librarians tasked with collection development must utilize a broad range of discovery tools to locate and evaluate appropriate resources. Acquisitions staff are compelled to interact with a greater number of vendors, aggregators, and publishers.


They must contend with licensing agreements, software compatibility issues, consortial arrangements, and distance program requirements hitherto beyond the scope of traditional technical services activities.

 

This trend toward more complexity in acquisitions has immediate implications for practicing librarians, vendors, educators and students in library and information science programs. Given the changes in the market and in the acquisitions process, we are examining the current educational preparation of acquisitions librarians to assess how LIS programs are preparing entry level professionals. Our methods include examining the courses offered within the programs accredited by the ALA within the United States and Canada. In addition, we will review job vacancy announcements along with the content of a variety of competency documents that have been developed over the past fifteen years that specify the qualifications that librarians must hold in order to provide adequate services. Future research will include interviewing faculty, acquisitions librarians, and vendors.  Together, these data will provide a snapshot of the acquisitions workforce, skills analysis, and projection of career needs into the future.

 

 


 

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Cameron Tuai
ctuai@indiana.edu
PhD Candidate
School of Library and Information Science
Indiana University – Bloomington


85. Administration and Management

 

Using Contingency Theory to Frame Collaboration within an Information Service Unit

 

The collaboration of librarians and technologists to deliver information services represents a new and growing organizational challenge for many library administrators.  The information service literature reveals that a common method of integrating collaborative partners is through horizontal organizational structures.  Missing from this literature is a discussion on how to achieve integration while minimizing the costs associated with these time- and labor-intensive structures.  Contingency theory can provide a useful approach to understand and manage the costs of collaboration by allowing managers to determine (a) when  to use or avoid horizontal structures; (b) when and how to use lower cost alternatives structures; and (c) how to set goals to better control integrating structures.  

Contingency theory seeks to identify the organizational structure that best fits an organization’s contingency, or context.  Previous applications of contingency theory into a library context have largely failed to confirm expected relationships.  Analysis of these studies suggests that this problem is due to researchers underestimating the complexity of the library context.  This underestimation leads to the stratification of the library into large units of analysis such as divisions.  Unfortunately, these sub-sets are internally heterogeneous or externally homogeneous, thus confounding efforts to confirm expected contingency theory relationships.  One solution to this methodological problem is to define the study population using a smaller unit of analysis, such as an information service unit.  Reducing the number of variables examined can reduce sampling error in regard to the contingency variables under study.  

 

 


 

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Diane L. Velasquez
dvelasquez@dom.edu
Assistant Professor
Dominican University
7900 Division St.
7901 River Forest, IL 60305


90. Evaluation of Service

 

National Survey of Practices: E-Government and Public Access Computers in Public Libraries

 

The research undertaken is a survey that has been sent out to 1485 public libraries serving a population of 25,000 to 99,999. This particular population has according to research done previously has approximately 10 public access computers and has been affected by the e-government movement (Bertot, McClure, & Jaeger, 2006).  The survey is looking at public libraries use of government documents and internet connected computers.  Government agencies have been sending patrons to public libraries to access their materials.  Has sending patrons to libraries for government documents or e-government had a corresponding impact on the services provided by the staff?

As of August 24, 2009, there have been 773 (52%) usable responses to the survey out of 836 received.  The majority of the responses have come from self-identified suburban public libraries although there are responses from rural and urban libraries.  The preliminary findings show that the number one reason patrons use computers is to obtain tax information or forms from the IRS. The libraries have a range of one to 331 computers from the respondents.  

 

 


 

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Kate Vo Thi-Beard
vothibeard@wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Doctoral Student


7. Libraries and Society/Culture

 

Asian-American Magazines and Their Role in the Production and Dissemination of Information:  Building Community and Cultural Identity Among Readers of Audrey and Asian Wisconzine

 

My work-in-progress identifies the place of Asian-American magazines and their role in the production and dissemination of information.  Specifically, I examine Audrey and Asian Wisconzine to identify how these magazines build community and cultural identity among readers.  Audrey is a national, bimonthly, English-language, Asian-American women’s lifestyle magazine while Asian Wisconzine is a regional publication based out of Wisconsin.  AW "provides a cultural focus on diverse Asian peoples who have chosen Wisconsin as their new home.  It is a forum for ideas, stories, and events that revolve around Asian American communities, woven together to create an educational tool for understanding and acceptance of each other's differences."

 

My research questions center upon the roles of Audrey and Asian Wisconzine in building community and cultural identity.  They include:  Who are the readers, which Asian/Asian-American  communities are featured and how are they featured, and what do we know about how cultural identities and values are represented?  My research methods include a content analysis of the magazines by examining the advertisements, letters to the editor, and feature stories.  Through triangulation of these sources, I attempt to identify the readership of Audrey and Asian Wisconzine.  The identification of these readerships provides a bigger umbrella of the readership of Asian-American popular magazines, their production and dissemination of information, and their contribution to the expansion or knowledge of the readership of ethnic magazines in the United States.

 

 


 

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Holly Weimar, Ed. D.
haw001@shsu.edu
Assistant Professor
Sam Houston State University
Department of Library Science

 

Tricia Kuon, Ph. D.
tav005@shsu.edu
Assistant Professor
Sam Houston State University
Department of Library Science

 

19 Distance Education in LIS

 

Granted: Scholarships, School Librarians, and Culture

 

Recently, the Sam Houston State University Department of Library Science was awarded the Institute of Museums and Library Services Laura Bush 21st Century Program Grant for over $800,000 to fund 40 scholarships for students in South Texas. Upon the successful completion of the Library Science program, these scholarship recipients will receive their Master of Library Science degrees. During the application process, the Library Science Department was overwhelmed with more than 600 applications for the mostly online program. One of the requirements of the applications was to submit a statement of need. Within this statement, the committee began to notice a pattern emerging among the applicants’ needs. A question is being posed: Does a full scholarship entice teachers into school librarianship for similar reasons when culture is taken into account? An interest in Distance Education, pursuing further education, and in LIS was stated among the many applicants. Learning as to whether these interests displayed in the cultures represented in the applicants uniformly is of interest to the researchers.


Indication of special needs: Best design for research approach. Weimar has experience in narrative research. Kuon has experience with literary analysis.  

 


 

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Understanding Users’ Needs for a Health Literacy Website:
The Information Horizons Approach

 

1 Xin Wang, Ph.D Candidate, xwbt8@mail.missouri.edu,
1 Erdelez, Sanda, Associate Professor, ErdelezS@mail.missouri.edu
1 Al Ghenaimi, Said Amer, Ph.D Student, saa7c4@mail.missouri.edu
2 Centner, Susan, BSN, scentner@rollanet.org
1 Chen, Weichao, Ph.D Student, wcxcf@mail.missouri.edu
1 Wang, Jiazhen, Ph.D Candidate, jw5wf@mail.missouri.edu
3 Ward, Deborah, MLS, WardDH@health.missouri.edu
1 Yadamsuren, Borchuluun, Ph.D Candidate, by888@mail.missouri.edu
1 School of Information Science & Learning Technologies, Information Experience Laboratory, University of Missouri, Tel: +1 573-884-2737
2 MAHEC Digital Library; Health Literacy Missouri
3 Health Science Libraries, University of Missouri, Health Literacy Missouri

 

Inadequate health literacy affects more than 90 million people in the United States (Moore, Bias, Prentice, Fletcher, & Vaughn, 2009). Traditionally, health providers have been the main sources of health information that patients rely on. Kim and Kim (2009) has found that the WWW has generated impact on patient-physicians’ communication. Studies (Eysenbach, Powell, Kuss, & Sa, 2002; Fisher, Burstein, Lynch, & Lazarenko, 2008; Renahy & Chauvin, 2006) have also revealed concerns about the quality and usefulness of web-based health information. Two questions that arise are how best will a website specifically designed for improving health literacy be used by target audiences; and how can a website be designed to meet the needs of diverse users?


The Missouri Foundation for Health is supporting several partners from around the state of Missouri in developing the Health Literacy Resource Inventory (HLMRI). HLMRI is a centralized web-based interactive digital library. To identify the needs of health literacy materials from different groups, the investigators employed a theoretical framework and methodology called Information Horizons, developed by Sonnenwald and Wildemuth (2001) to study three key user groups (health care providers, health care educators, and patients) of the HLMRI. Information Horizons methodology allows researchers to capture users’ preferences and preference criteria for health literacy resources, and to identify the relationship among them.


The data collection includes graphical maps of information horizons and in-depth interview transcripts from 15 patients, physicians, nurses, and health care educators. This poster will present the preliminary findings for user-centered design of the HLMRI website.   

 

References:
Eysenbach, G., Powell, J., Kuss, O., & Sa, E.-R. (2002). Empirical Studies Assessing the Quality of Health Information for Consumers on the World Wide Web: A Systematic Review J. Am. Med. Association, 287(20), 2691-2700.
Fisher, J., Burstein, F., Lynch, K., & Lazarenko, K. (2008). "Usability + usefulness = trust": An exploratory study of Australian health web sites. Internet Research, 18(5), 477-498.
Kim, J., & Kim, S. (2009). Physicians' perception of the effects of Internet health information on the doctor-patient relationship. Informatics for Health and Social Care, 34(3), 136-148.
Moore, M., Bias, R. G., Prentice, K., Fletcher, R., & Vaughn, T. (2009). Web usability testing with a hispanic medically underserved population. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 97(2), 114-121.
Renahy, E., & Chauvin, P. (2006). Internet uses for health information seeking: A literature review. Revue d'Epidemiologie et de Sante Publique, 54(3), 263-275.
Sonnenwald, D., & Wildemuth, B. (2001). Investigating Information Seeking Behavior Using the Concept of Information Horizons. paper presented at the Association for Library and Information Science Education Conference.

 
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